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Sage is a writer and photographer for Organic Lifestyle Magazine. At 18 years old Sage weighed more than 320 pounds. After years of being in persistent pain at such a young age, she decided it was time for a change. She started cranberry lemonade, a salad a day, cut out refined sugar and processed foods, Sage lost 100 pounds in less than a year. Today she likes to start her mornings with a run and weight lifting, and a big salad. She enjoys cooking, working out, and learning about health and the way of the Organic Lifestyle.

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Producing Glyphosate Results in Radioactive Waste


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Many are aware of the problems with the herbicide Glyphosate, the active ingredient in Round-up. It’s the most commonly used herbicide in the world today and has been known to cause cancers, fertility problems, and many other health problems not just in humans, but in other wildlife.

Producing glyphosate can cause just as much environmental damage as spraying it can. One of the main ingredients is phosphorus, produced by extracting it from the mineral phosphate ore, mined Florida and Idaho. Florida is called the “phosphate capital of the world”. Around 80% of the mineral is mined in Florida.

The chemical treatment used to create phosphoric acid creates large amounts of phosphogypsum, a radioactive waste product.

It may ultimately be impossible to determine whether the finished product or sourcing the material caused more damage to human health and the environment. What is certain is the financial gain enjoyed by the agrochemical industry. The global fertilizer market was worth $83.5 billion in 202017 and estimated to grow 1.69% from 2020 to 2027. This means the industry may be worth more than $93.9 billion by 2027.

Radioactive Waste Is a Damaging Agrochemical Byproduct

To avoid glyphosate try to shop organic whole produce as much as possible. Better yet, grow as much of your own food as you can!

Sage Edwards

Sage is a writer and photographer for Organic Lifestyle Magazine. At 18 years old Sage weighed more than 320 pounds. After years of being in persistent pain at such a young age, she decided it was time for a change. She started cranberry lemonade, a salad a day, cut out refined sugar and processed foods, Sage lost 100 pounds in less than a year. Today she likes to start her mornings with a run and weight lifting, and a big salad. She enjoys cooking, working out, and learning about health and the way of the Organic Lifestyle.

Bio Page  –  Author’s Website

Sage Edwards

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